Dr. Daniel Baumann, The Quantum Origin of Structure in the Universe

Speaker: Dr. Daniel Baumann (DAMTP)
Venue: Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Time: 3/11/2014 20:30, drinks from 20:15

Quantum fluctuations in the vacuum play an important role in fundamental physics. In this talk, I will show that these fluctuations get stretched to cosmic scales if the early universe experienced a period of inflationary expansion. Using little more than the quantum mechanics of a simple harmonic oscillator, I will compute this effect and explain how it provides the primordial seeds for all structure in the universe. I will show how these predictions compare to recent observations of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, I will speculate about the physical cause for the inflationary expansion.

 

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Dr. Julia Gog, Embarrassing Diseases

Speaker: Dr. Julia Gog (DAMTP)
Venue: Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Time: 27/10/2014 20:30, drinks from 20:15

The use of mathematical systems for modelling the spread of infectious disease has been around for quite a while now. Mathematical biologists have developed a world of intricate models including things like distribution of household sizes, population flows such as commute to work, airline transportation networks, seasonal and climate factors and what everyone had for breakfast. So we know in glorious detail how a decent pandemic ought to spread, right? Thing is, no one told influenza what it was supposed to do.

 

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Dr. Perla Sousi, A Lost Man Will Reach Home, but a Lost Bird Will be Lost Forever

Speaker: Dr. Perla Sousi (Stats Lab)
Venue: Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Time: 20/10/2014 20:30, drinks from 20:15

Suppose you are lost while trying to get home. At every corner you decide to take a random direction independently of what you did previously. Will you ever get back home? The answer depends on which dimension you live in. What if you give a preference to roads you have used before. Does the answer change?

 

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Dr. Piers Bursill-Hall, Pythagoras Never Existed. You Have Been Lied to, and All School Maths is False

Speaker: Dr. Piers Bursill-Hall (DPMMS)
Venue: Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Time: 13/10/2014 20:30, drinks from 20:15

Everyone in the Universe has heard of Pythagoras, and knows about the Theorem, and how the Pythagoreans discovered that root-two is irrational. And all of that is false: in fact, just about everything you have been told about ancient mathematics is wrong and rubbish. Hey: Welcome to Cambridge.

Free and open to all.

 

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TMS Squash 2014

Wednesday 8th October 19:30-21:30

Junior Parlor, T Blue Boar Court (Trinity College)

We welcome students from all subjects and colleges. Whether you wish to join our society, or just chat to other students and find out more about us, we are looking forward to seeing you. Light refreshments will be provided.

Ask at the Trinity Porter’s Lodge for directions.

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Michaelmas 2014 Termcard

All talks are to be held in the Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College, and will begin at 8.30pm with port and orange juice from 8.15pm. With the exception of the first talk, which is open to all, talks are for members only; non-members may join at the door.

Monday, 13th October: Dr. Piers Bursill-Hall (DPMMS):
Pythagoras Never Existed. You Have Been Lied to, and All School Maths is False.
Everyone in the Universe has heard of Pythagoras, and knows about the Theorem, and how the Pythagoreans discovered that root-two is irrational. And all of that is false: in fact, just about everything you have been told about ancient mathematics is wrong and rubbish. Hey: Welcome to Cambridge.

Monday, 20th October: Dr. Perla Sousi (Stats Lab):
A Lost Man Will Reach Home, but a Lost Bird Will be Lost Forever
Suppose you are lost while trying to get home. At every corner you decide to take a random direction independently of what you did previously. Will you ever get back home? The answer depends on which dimension you live in. What if you give a preference to roads you have used before. Does the answer change?

Monday, 27th October: Dr. Julia Gog (DAMTP):
Embarrassing Diseases
The use of mathematical systems for modelling the spread of infectious disease has been around for quite a while now. Mathematical biologists have developed a world of intricate models including things like distribution of household sizes, population flows such as commute to work, airline transportation networks, seasonal and climate factors and what everyone had for breakfast. So we know in glorious detail how a decent pandemic ought to spread, right? Thing is, no one told influenza what it was supposed to do.

Monday, 3rd November: Dr. Daniel Baumann (DAMTP):
The Quantum Origin of Structure in the Universe
Quantum fluctuations in the vacuum play an important role in fundamental physics. In this talk, I will show that these fluctuations get stretched to cosmic scales if the early universe experienced a period of inflationary expansion. Using little more than the quantum mechanics of a simple harmonic oscillator, I will compute this effect and explain how it provides the primordial seeds for all structure in the universe. I will show how these predictions compare to recent observations of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, I will speculate about the physical cause for the inflationary expansion.

Monday, 10th November: Dr. James Cranch (University of Sheffield):
Which Real Numbers are Pleasant?
Every well-educated fresher has already been indoctrinated with the right answer to this question: reals are either algebraic or transcendental. Algebraic numbers are obviously fantastic. By contrast, the transcendental numbers are utterly hideous and deserve no attention whatsoever, with the two exceptions of pi and e (bless their little cotton socks). Contrary to this received opinion, I’ll explain why it should be a major goal of 21st-century mathematics to reclaim more of the reals for explicit use by mathematicians, and I’ll tell you about some difficult problems that need to be solved along the way.

Monday, 17th November: Prof. Benjamin Allanach (DAMTP):
Possible Hints for Supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider
The Large Hadron Collider is about to start operation again at a higher energy at the beginning of 2015. I shall introduce the machine, particle physics and the discovery of the Higgs boson. Standard theory predicts that the quantum fluctuations should make the Higgs boson much heavier than it is observed to be, but a speculative theory of particle physics (supersymmetry) explains why the quantum fluctuations are small. This theory predicts a host of new particles for the LHC to find. There were a few small anomalies in LHC data already that can be interpreted as the production of certain supersymmetric particles. Such interpretations are ready for further experimental testing next year.

Monday, 24th November: Dr. Nathanaël Berestycki (Stats Lab):
Emergence of Symmetry in Planar Probability
I will describe several simple and natural random systems which exist on the two-dimensional infinite square grid. Often there is a “critical point” for these systems. At this point, it has been predicted for more than 30 years that these systems acquire an unexpected symmetry: invariance under conformal transformations of the complex plane.

I will explain what that means, discuss some examples, and try to convey a few ideas about remarkable progress which has taken place in the last 15 years to describe these objects rigorously, notably Schramm’s famous SLE random curves.

Monday, 1st December:
Mathmo Call My Bluff
Come and celebrate Christmas with the TMS’s annual Call My Bluff event. Watch a Freshers’ Team take on a team drawn from the combined might of the rest of the university in a competition in which mathematical knowledge takes a second place to the ability to hold a good poker face.

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Garden Party

Celebrate the end of Tripos at the TMS’s May Week garden party. Trinity College Fellow’s Bowling Green (off Great Court, entrance by the Clock Tower), Wednesday 11th June, 2:30-4:30.

We will have a surplus of Pimms, Food and hopefully sunshine. Entry will be free to members, and non-members can join on the door, so bring your friends.

In the event of rain, we will be relocating to underneath the Wren Library.

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Results of the AGM

At the Annual General Meeting held today, the role of Membership Secretary was created. The committee for the next year was also voted in and will be:

President: Sam Tickle

Vice President: Josh Lam

Secretary: Alex Chamolly

Junior Treasurer: Oliver Feng

Constable: Mary Fortune

Membership Secretary: Adam Goucher

 

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TMS AGM 2014

The Trinity Maths Society AGM will be taking place on Wednesday 12th March, at 7:30pm, in the Blue Boar Common Room (Trinity College). Sean Moss will be acting as returning officer. Please come along and vote!

The list of people running for positions on the Trinity Maths Society committee 2014-2015 is:

President:

Sam Tickle

Vice President:

Josh Lam

Junior Treasurer:

Andrew McClement
Oliver Feng

Secretary:

Alex Chamolly
Daniel Hu
Adam Shannon

Membership Secretary:

Adam Goucher

Constable:

Mary Fortune

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Dr. Rachel Camina, Conjugacy Classes in Finite Groups

Speaker:Dr. Rachel Camina (DPMMS):
Venue: Winstanley Lecture Theatre
Time: 10/03/2014 20:30, drinks from 20:15

If we know the sizes of conjugacy classes in a finite group what does this tell us about the group? We will discuss this problem.

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