To Light a Candle

“TO LIGHT A CANDLE”, A DOCUMENTARY FILM BY MAZIAR BAHARI

To Light a Candle

27th February at 7:00pm
Lecture Room, Hills Road Sixth Form College, Cambridge, CB2 8PE

Film duration: 55 minutes
Trailer:

Iran stops Bahá’ís from teaching and studying at university. But they do teach. And they do study.

“To Light a Candle” chronicles the lives of Bahá’ís in Iran, who have triumphed against unbelievable hardships and persecution. The Bahá’ís are a religious minority that are systematically imprisoned, tortured and killed by the Iranian government.

The Islamic regime bans the Bahá’ís to study or teach in Iranian universities. Since 1987 the Bahá’ís started the Bahá’í Institute for Higher Education (BIHE), an underground university with hundreds of students in Iran, and dozens of teachers in Iran and around the world. Through powerful interviews, exclusive secret footage shot by citizen journalists, rare archival material and letters written by a Bahá’í prisoner currently in jail in Iran, “To Light a Candle” shows how a small minority has defied the brutal systematic religious persecution through non-violent resistance and educating their youth.

Summary of Festival of Ideas events this year

Below is a summary of the Festival of Ideas events organised by the Cambridge University Bahá’í Society this year. Please click the links for more information.

  1. The gathering sound: Weaving a tapestry of sacred text, invocations, and poetry from the world’s spiritual traditions, this musical odyssey celebrates humanity’s inter-connectedness.
  2. Young people: What is our identity? How can we discover our true potential, inner capacities, and unique talents and use them to create the kind of world we really want?
  3. From the selfish me to the selfless selfInsights from science and mysticism on the paradox of identity.
  4. Nahal Mavaddat and Jacqueline Lam-McArthur read poems by Bahá’í women imprisoned in Iran because of their beliefs and how the poetry speaks of their resilience in the face of hardship.
  5. Faiths for climate action: multi-faith walkJoin a movement of people from all different faiths in Cambridge, to take a walk celebrating unity between religious identities in the face of climate change challenges.

Festival of Ideas: Faiths for Action multi-faith walk

Faiths for climate action: multi-faith walk

Join a movement of people from all different faiths in Cambridge, to take a walk celebrating unity between religious identities in the face of climate change challenges. A move towards low-carbon lifestyles to reduce human impact on climate change raises deep questions about the nature of truly fulfilling lives and design of flourishing societies. To reduce carbon emissions at the level that is required to impact climate change, radical rethinking of our personal, social and economic actions is needed, much of which can be informed by spiritual and faith identities.

6:00pm – 7:30pm, Friday 24 October
Beside Riverside Bridge, next to the Museum of Technology, Riverside Road, Cambridge CB5 8JB

No need to book (just turn up). More information is available here.

Women of the World: Poems by Bahá’í Women

Nahal Mavaddat and Jacqueline Lam-McArthur read poems by Bahá’í women imprisoned in Iran because of their beliefs and how the poetry speaks of their resilience in the face of hardship.

12 noon – 1pm, Sunday 26 October
Cambridge Junction (Foyer area), Clifton Way, Cambridge CB1 7GX

This is the only event organised by the Bahá’í Society that requires payment but gives you access to other Women of the World (WoW) Festival events. Tickets can be purchased here.

Festival of Ideas: From the Selfish Me to the Selfless Self

From the selfish me to the selfless self: Insights from science and mysticism on the paradox of identity.

A talk by Ismael Velasco.

3pm – 4pm, Sunday 2 November
Latimer Room, Clare College. Trinity Lane, Cambridge CB2 1TL

Organised by the Cambridge University Bahá’í Society as part of the Multifaith Series.  Free and open to all. Tickets can be booked here.

Festival_of_Ideas_2014_Paradox_Identity

Festival of Ideas: Young people: What is our identity?

Young people: What is our identity? How can we discover our true potential, inner capacities, and unique talents and use them to create the kind of world we really want?

Talk and lively discussion with members of the Bahá’í Society, alongside Ismael Velasco.

3pm – 4pm, Saturday 1 November
Little Hall Lecture Theatre, Sidgwick Site

Organised by the Cambridge University Bahá’í Society as part of the Multifaith Series.  Free and open to all. Tickets can be booked here.

Festival_of_Ideas_2014_Young_People_Identity

Festival of Ideas: The Gathering Sound

The gathering sound: Weaving a tapestry of sacred text, invocations, and poetry from the world’s spiritual traditions, this musical odyssey celebrates humanity’s inter-connectedness.

A concert with Richard Leigh and friends.

3pm  – 4pm, Saturday 25 October
Michaelhouse Centre, Trinity Lane, Cambridge CB2 1SU

Organised by the Cambridge University Bahá’í Society as part of the Multifaith Series.  Free and open to all. Tickets can be booked here.

Festival_of_Ideas_2014_Gathering_Sound

“Excluded but not Defeated” talk on 7th May

Excluded but not Defeated: The Constructive Resilience of Bahá’ís in Iran in Light of Education Denial

Wednesday, 7th May, from 7:30-9:30pm, in the Latimer Room (Old Court) of Clare College on Trinity Lane, Cambridge, CB2 1TL

In this presentation, Dr. Ghanea will explore the themes of exclusion, constructive resilience, and education access as they apply to the current political situation in Iran, where Bahá’ís and other minority groups are systemically denied human rights. She will discuss these issues in light of both historical and legal aspects, applying Bahá’í principles derived from the Faith’s scriptural texts. Her talk will be accompanied by portions of the 30-minute documentary Education Under Fire. This film addresses the denial of higher education to Bahá’ís in Iran and the need for schools to consider offering academic credit to Iranian students through distance learning programmes.
Biography
Nazila Ghanea, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of International Human Rights Law at the University of Oxford and a member of the OSCE Advisory Panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion or Belief.  She serves on the board of governors of the United Rights Group and was part of a research team investigating Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales until early 2013.  Nazila has acted as a human rights consultant for a number of governments, the United Nations, UNESCO, OSCE, the Council of Europe, and the EU.  Her publications include 9 books, a number of UN publications, and numerous journal articles and reports, including Are religious minorities really minorities?; Does God Believe in Human Rights?; and Human Rights, the UN, and Bahá’ís in Iran.  Additionally, she has published an analysis of Iran’s proposed human rights charter in EJIL Talk, the blog of the European Journal of International Law, on December 10, 2013.

 

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Belief in Science & Belief in God

Belief in Science & Belief in God: A Scientist’s Perspective on “New Atheism”

Talk and Q&A Session with Canadian physicist Dr. Dinesh Singh

Eye_earth
Wednesday, 26 February 2014, 7.30 pm – 9:30 pm
Friends Meeting House (Aldren Wright Room)
12 Jesus Lane, Cambridge CB5 8BA

The modern-day proponents of atheism, such as Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, and Lawrence Krauss have gained the public’s imagination regarding their claims that God does not exist and that organized religion is harmful to the human race.  They also claim that “no evidence” exists whatsoever to support the presence of God in human experience, suggesting on scientific grounds that the need for a Divine Creator is a “failed hypothesis.”  Furthermore, they contend that holding a belief in God is a “delusional” act with disastrous consequences for global society on multiple fronts.

According to the teachings of Bahá’u’lláh, Prophet-Founder of the Bahá’í Faith, science and religion are both complementary and necessary for the progress of humanity into the future.

In this presentation, Dr. Dinesh Singh offers interested people the opportunity to thoughtfully consider his professional and personal response to the “new atheism” of Dawkins and others with examples from theoretical physics to suggest that “belief” within science is not fundamentally different from “belief” within religion, and that the main conclusions drawn by these atheists about the science and religion debate need to be thoroughly re-examined.

Dinesh Singh, Ph.D. is a Canadian research scientist in theoretical physics at the University of Regina, Adjunct Professor at the University of Saskatchewan, and a member of the Bahá’í Faith.

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